Growth of Lactobacillus Aureus and Lactic Acid Bacteria in Co-Culture With E. Coli

07/02/2021 by No Comments

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Abstract: The study of the interaction between coculture systems with mammalian cells and various forms of auxotrophy has been focused for many years on the ability of mammalian cells to adapt to the microenvironment that characterizes auxotrophy in coculture. In the present paper, we consider an adaptive system composed of mammalian cells and auxotrophic fungi, which have been used to study the effects of auxotrophy on coculture. These cell types have been studied as well as cell cultures that comprise the interactions between mammalian cells and animal pathogen or fungal pathogen that are unable to adapt their growth to the nutrient limitations imposed in the microbial coculture. We describe the methods that have been used in the studies of coculture to determine the extent of coculture adaptation and the degree of auxotrophic growth of the fungus when in contact with mammalian cells. The work is discussed in the context of current knowledge regarding auxotrophic growth of fungi, the mechanisms that regulate auxotrophy and the effects of auxotrophy on the coculture ecosystem.

Blanckenschlager, Ph. , of the University of Tennessee College of Medicine, was a researcher in the Department of Microbiology and Immunology from 1989 through 2010. He then became the director of the Office of Research and Graduate Education in the College of Veterinary and Life Sciences from 2011 through July 2011, where he served as an investigator on five R&G grants. He was appointed to his current position at the University of Tennessee College of Veterinary and Life Sciences at the beginning of July 2015. His interests have been in animal models and biology of disease.

Editor’s Note: Paul Blanckenschlager is the corresponding author of this paper. Both authors are also affiliated with the University of Tennessee College of Veterinary and Life Sciences. Blanckenschlager is the current director of the Office of Research and Graduate Education in the college of veterinary and life sciences, while Dr. Schuurman is a research associate in the department of microbiology and immunology.

Growth of Lactobacillus aureus and Lactic Acid bacteria in co-culture with E. coli

Article Title: Growth of Lactobacillus aureus and Lactic Acid bacteria in co-culture with E coli | Computer Hardware.

Background: The use of Lactobacillus and Lactic Acid bacteria (LAB) co-cultures may be useful in the production of beverages, the production of fermented foods, the production of probiotics, and the production of prebiotics. A key challenge is to optimize the co-culture by selecting the appropriate culture medium, the appropriate culture conditions, and appropriate cell ratios.

Objective: The purpose of this study was to optimize the co-culture of LAB and E. coli to produce the next generation of fermented beverages.

Methods: Six strains of LAB were used to optimize the growth of E. coli during co-culture. A total of 32 different types of substrates were investigated for their effect on the growth of E. The effect of pH, temperature, substrate source, culture medium and culture conditions on the growth of LAB were investigated. A model was developed to describe the growth of E. coli and LAB.

Results: When the culture conditions were similar to the conditions for E. coli growth, the optimum culture conditions were identified to be a pH of 7. 50, 40°C and 5% glucose. When the substrate source was Lactobacillus fermentum strain WL10, the optimal culture medium and conditions were 5% glucose and a pH of 5. When the substrate source was C. butyricum strain I10, the optimal culture conditions were 5% glucose and a pH of 5. When the substrate source was C. beijerinckii strain W39, the optimal culture medium and conditions were a pH of 5. 30, a temperature of 40°C, and a substrate concentration of 5%. When the substrate source was L. fermentum strain WK-H-2, the optimal culture conditions were 5% glucose, a pH of 5. 16, a temperature of 35°C, and a substrate concentration of 0. For all the four strains of LAB, the highest cell densities were produced with a substrate concentration of 0%.

Conclusions: Co-culture of E. coli and LAB strains can be achieved under the optimal conditions.

Growth of L. casei or L. sakei in supplemented M9 media

Abstract:The aim of this study is to examine the effect of adding glucose (glucose was used as the sugar source mainly) to the growth medium on the growth of L casei or L sakei. The growth curves of L casei or L sakei in M9 agar, glucose (M9 glucose), or M9 broth for 5 days are determined at the concentrations 0. 0%, 10% and 50% glucose. The pH value, pH 7. 2, is also measured during each growth experiment. The influence of temperature and the effect of pH on the growth of L casei or L sakei in the growth medium are also investigated at the concentrations 0. 0%, and 10% glucose. The growth rates of both L casei and L sakei in M9 glucose are faster than those in M9 broth and M9 agar. The maximum growth rates of L casei at the concentrations of 1.

Effect of the initial inoculum number of L. casei in co-culture with E. coli.

Article Title: Effect of the initial inoculum number of L casei in co-culture with E coli | Computer Hardware. Full Article Text: Introduction This article reports the effect of the number of L casei cells used in a co-culture experiment on the growth of E coli. Lcasei spores and E coli cells were co-cultured in a liquid medium composed of a salt solution and a carbohydrate source in a total volume of 1/3 of the total volume of the medium. This study aims to provide an insight about the effect of the initial number of bacterial cells on the overall growth and composition of each bacterial culture during co-culture. The main advantages of this study are (a) it’s easy to conduct in the laboratory and (b) the results of this study are generalizable to other types of L casei and bacteria co-cultures. Methods The experiments were conducted in a 5-ml glass culture tube with the cell-culture medium, which was added to the lower compartment. The lower compartment contained the co-cultured samples and the upper compartment was sterile and supplied with the sodium chloride buffer. The initial inoculum numbers of 1×10(3) L casei spores and 2. 5×10(3) E coli cells were investigated. After the initial co-culture process for 10 h, the growth medium was replaced and re-incubated for another 1 h. Finally, the cells were harvested by centrifugation, and the growth medium was analyzed. Results The growth of both bacterial species increased with the initial inoculum numbers of both species. The growth of both L casei and E coli on the initial numbers of L casei spores was the greatest than that of E coli on the initial numbers of E coli cells. The growth of L casei and E coli was most active when the initial number of E coli cells was less than the number of L casei spores. Conclusion The growth of both L casei and E coli cells increased with the initial number of E coli cells. Therefore, further research is warranted to investigate the effect of the initial inoculum number of the L casei in co-culture with the E coli.

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