The Legacy of Kristin Schock

07/27/2021 by No Comments

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In April 2017 the Big Brothers Big Sisters of Greater Orlando Foundation (BBBGSO) Executive Director Kristin Schock passed away. The BBBGSO is an organization that provides services to youth and adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities of all types living in the Orlando area. For the past two years Schock was the face of the organization, the one responsible for a large majority of volunteers that support BBBGSO programs in the community, as well as the many programs in which BBBGSO volunteers served. She was also the first woman to hold the job at BBBGSO and the first to serve as the Executive Director of the organization. As an advocate for our community, Schock worked tirelessly to expand the organization’s programming and services to reach the youth and adults with disabilities in the community. She was particularly involved in promoting new ways to utilize technology and to offer support and education for those who have intellectual and developmental disabilities. She worked tirelessly to create programs to support the BBBGSO’s mission, creating a variety of programs and services to enhance the lives of children and adults with intellectual disabilities. Schock’s dedication to the BBBGSO was not only her own passion, but her passion for the well being of BBBGSO clients and their families. Her leadership and passion for the BBBGSO was a constant in the face of the challenging circumstances that faced the organization. Schock’s efforts were not always recognized by her peers in the community, but her efforts were recognized by those who worked with her every day. Schock’s impact on the BBBGSO was made not because of her work, but because of her commitment to the well-being of all the clients in her care. She had a sense of community and of the importance of community. She had a sense of hope, and she lived that hope, and used her talents and gifts to create a legacy of helping others. She lived her life with purpose, not for a career, but because of her commitment to the mission of the BBBGSO. Her legacy will be seen as the influence within the mission of the BBBGSO.

Lori Dossett –

ideas of its citizens.

political tool.

political force.

it is far from perfect.

without the government.

will also be a government that will use its power to censor the Internet.

freedom of speech to the freedom of the press.

civilization.

A Conversation with Penn, Rethemeier and Samuels.

A Conversation with Penn, Rethemeier and Samuels.

This paper was submitted in response to the workshop entitled, “The Future of Programming Languages”, held at the First International Conference on COCO Conference (Vancouver, British Columbia, July 6-11, 2004). The workshop concluded with a panel discussion, during which, it was learned that one of the participants is now working for the International Language Technology Association (ILTA), and the others are employed by the Linguist Society of Canada.

This paper discusses the current state of programming languages and presents an outline of the future of programming languages, based strictly on the work done in the past two or three years. A key point in this effort is the use of a “language agnostic” view of programming languages, with programming in such languages being viewed not only as a way of solving problems but as an evolutionary process where the “best” languages emerge.

The paper begins with a short review of the history of the field of functional programming languages, with emphasis on the “Fork–Join Programming” strategy of designing languages from scratch. Then it briefly discusses the current state of programming languages and discusses a few ways that things could change. The main part of the paper presents a discussion of the history of the programming languages, with an emphasis on the work done by the Penn Computer Science department. A separate chapter is devoted to the history of Computer Algebra, with a summary of work done in this area. Finally, a brief discussion of modern approaches to programming languages and programming languages is presented.

This paper discusses the current state of programming languages and presents an outline of the future of programming languages based strictly on the work done in the past two or three years. A key point in this effort is the use of a “language agnostic” view of programming languages, with programming in such languages being viewed not only as a way of solving problems but as an evolutionary process where the “best” languages emerge.

The paper begins with a short review of the history of the field of functional programming languages, with emphasis on the “Fork–Join Programming” strategy of designing languages from scratch. Then it briefly discusses the current state of programming languages and discusses a few ways that things could change.

A conversation with Pat Sukhum at Big Brothers Big Sisters

A conversation with Pat Sukhum at Big Brothers Big Sisters

The conversation with Pat Sukhum at the Big Brothers Big Sisters of Philadelphia’s annual Big Brother Big Sister event was first published in the Big Brothers Big Sisters Annual Report 2016.

The Big Brother Big Sister of Philadelphia was recently in Philadelphia, Pa. to promote their event and interview Pat Sukhum, the new Big Brother Big Sister of Delaware County. Pat Sukhum served as Delaware County’s first Big Brother Big Sister for a year and a half and she is now the Founder of the Delaware County Big Brother Big Sister Association. While Pat Sukhum has been a Big Brother Big Sister for the last 2 years in Delaware County, she has also been a Big Brother Big Sister in Northern Virginia and in Maryland. Pat Sukhum has also served as Deputy Director of the Delaware County Big Brother Big Sister Association and Vice President of the Delaware County Association of Big Brothers and Big Sisters. Pat Sukhum has also served as a Big Brother Big Sister for many years throughout the United States and has served in this position for 11 years. She was recognized with a number of awards and is one of the most highly sought-after Big Brother Big Sister of Pennsylvania at any time. Pat Sukhum is a mother of 3 children and works full-time as a realtor and an entrepreneur who is raising her family, has been in this position for the past 10 years.

The interview was very enjoyable because I was able to talk with Pat Sukhum in a relaxed manner. She was friendly and talked about her Big Brother Big Sister Association, the family, and the family of Delaware. She was able to explain Big Brothers and Big Sister to me in a manner that was easy to understand and I was able to understand her position in Delaware County. Pat Sukhum is truly great to work with. I look forward to interviewing the others in the Delaware County Big Brother Big Sister Association and I would recommend Pat Sukhum as one of the most important Big Brother Big Sister in Delaware County.

Pat Sukhum’s interview with us was recorded at Big Brothers Big Sisters of Philadelphia and I can definitely say that Pat Sukhum sounds, sounds and sounds like one of those people who loves helping out in any capacity. Her enthusiasm, and her commitment to the Big Brothers Big Sisters organization was apparent on the recording of the interview.

Tips of the Day in Programming

I’ve been doing some thinking lately on how to solve problems related to Python.

It’s hard to read the code I’ve written in Python, because the language has no real concept of indentation. The only way to know if something is an object is to look at the __class__ and __module__ attributes: if it’s in the list, then you know it is an object. If it’s not in the list, then there is no way to tell if it is an object.

If you were to write a comment in Python, a space is not a linebreak, and the cursor is in an indented block, but your comment is not indented. If you have indented your code, you can still see that the cursor is at the beginning of your comment.

It would be nice if there was an attribute on a Python class called “spaceindent”.

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